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Title: Localized surface plasmon controlled chemistry at and beyond the nanoscale

Gaining valuable insight into chemistry-related fields, such as molecular and catalytic systems, surface science, and biochemistry, requires probing physical and chemical processes at the sub-nanoscale level. Recent progress and advancements in nano-optics and nano-photonics, particularly in scanning near-field optical microscopy, have enabled the coupling of light with nano-objects using surface plasmons with sub-nanoscale precision, providing access to photophysical and photochemical processes. Herein, this review highlights the basic concepts of surface plasmons and recent experimental findings of tip-assisted plasmon-induced research works and offers a glimpse into future perspectives.

 
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Award ID(s):
1944796
NSF-PAR ID:
10404942
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
American Institute of Physics
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Chemical Physics Reviews
Volume:
4
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2688-4070
Page Range / eLocation ID:
Article No. 021301
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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