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Title: A Mechanistic Perspective on the Mechanochemical Method To Reduce Carbonyl Groups with Stainless Steel and Water
Abstract

Mechanochemistry through high‐speed ball milling has become an increasingly popular method for performing organic transformations. This newfound interest in high‐speed ball milling is in part driven by the benefit of performing reactions in the absence of solvent. Mechanochemical reactions are often conducted in stainless‐steel vials with stainless‐steel balls. Since stainless steel is made of several readily oxidizable metals (Fe, Cr, and Ni), reduction reactions using water as a hydrogen source were explored using a temperature‐controlled mixer mill. Mechanistic studies suggest that the reduction proceeds via a single electron transfer (SET) pathway, with iron and nickel being essential components for the reaction.

 
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Award ID(s):
2102192
NSF-PAR ID:
10410804
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
European Journal of Organic Chemistry
Volume:
26
Issue:
23
ISSN:
1434-193X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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