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Title: Auditory Environments and Hearing Aid Feature Activation Among Younger and Older Listeners in an Urban and Rural Area
Award ID(s):
1838830
NSF-PAR ID:
10411794
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Ear & Hearing
Volume:
44
Issue:
3
ISSN:
1538-4667
Page Range / eLocation ID:
603 to 618
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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