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Title: Kinetic Control via Binding Sites within the Confined Space of Metal Metalloporphyrin‐Frameworks for Enhanced Shape‐Selectivity Catalysis
Abstract

One striking feature of enzyme is its controllable ability to trap substrates via synergistic or cooperative binding in the enzymatic pocket, which renders the shape‐selectivity of product by the confined spatial environment. The success of shape‐selective catalysis relies on the ability of enzyme to tune the thermodynamics and kinetics for chemical reactions. In emulation of enzyme's ability, we showcase herein a targeting strategy with the substrate being anchored on the internal pore wall of metal‐organic frameworks (MOFs), taking full advantage of the sterically kinetic control to achieve shape‐selectivity for the reactions. For this purpose, a series of binding site‐accessible metal metalloporphyrin‐frameworks (MMPFs) have been investigated to shed light on the nature of enzyme‐mimic catalysis. They exhibit a different density of binding sites that are well arranged into the nanospace with corresponding distances of opposite binding sites. Such a structural specificity results in a facile switch in selectivity from an exclusive formation of the thermodynamically stable product to the kinetic product. Thus, the proposed targeting strategy, based on the combination of porous materials and binding events, paves a new way to develop highly efficient heterogeneous catalysts for shifting selectivity.

 
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Award ID(s):
1834750
NSF-PAR ID:
10414149
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Volume:
62
Issue:
26
ISSN:
1433-7851
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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