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Title: An Investigation of the PERvasive Learning Systems Impact on Soldiers’ Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulation Skills
The current study an empirical evaluation of the PERvasive Learning System (PERLS). PERLS is a mobile microlearning platform designed for learning anytime and anywhere, taking advantage of planned and unplanned time during a learner’s daily schedule to enhance and reinforce learning. Soldiers taking classes from the Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, KY were recruited. This evaluation compared the impact of PERLS on soldiers’ self-efficacy for their self-regulated learning ability. This evaluation found evidence of impact for the PERLS when implemented into classroom setting with soldiers that used PERLS indicating higher self-efficacy scores.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1828010
NSF-PAR ID:
10432761
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting
Volume:
66
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2169-5067
Page Range / eLocation ID:
742 to 746
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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