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Title: Belief-Propagation with Quantum Messages for Polar Codes on Classical-Quantum Channels
This paper considers the design and decoding of polar codes for general classical-quantum (CQ) channels. It focuses on decoding via belief-propagation with quantum messages (BPQM) and, in particular, the idea of paired-measurement BPQM (PM-BPQM) decoding. Since the PM-BPQM decoder admits a classical density evolution (DE) analysis, one can use DE to design a polar code for any CQ channel and then efficiently compute the trade-off between code rate and error probability. We have also implemented and tested a classical simulation of our PM-BPQM decoder for polar codes. While the decoder can be implemented efficiently on a quantum computer, simulating the decoder on a classical computer actually has exponential complexity. Thus, simulation results for the decoder are somewhat limited and are included primarily to validate our theoretical results.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2106213
NSF-PAR ID:
10435570
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2023 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory (ISIT)
ISSN:
2157-8095
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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