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Title: Recent Advances in Cyberattack Detection and Mitigation Techniques for Renewable Photovoltaic Distributed Energy CPS
Cyberattacks targeted to the energy cyber-physical system (ECPS), also known as the smart grid, could interrupt the electricity supply with major ramifications. Attackers identify and exploit any vulnerable portion of the energy power grid, including the inverters with solar-powered photovoltaic (PV) panels. PV presents unique challenges as electricity consumers have also become providers of solar energy for utilities. As mandates require increased PV penetration across the world for positive environmental impacts, increased cyberattacks targeted at PV systems impact reliability and efficiency within the ECPS. The new technologies continuously being introduced to manage the ECPS and ensure bi-directional communications and energy flow between components also lead to more attack surfaces, system vulnerabilities, and heightened malicious attacks. Data integrity attacks are increasing within PV systems. In this paper, we present a survey of different methods that are proposed and explored for identifying and preventing cyberattacks targeted at PV systems. The attack detection methods include voltage control, data diodes, and voltage measurement algorithms. Furthermore, we present blockchain, cyber switching, and other attack mitigation techniques for PV systems.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1828811
NSF-PAR ID:
10436354
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Computing Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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