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Title: 8.1 μ m-emitting InP-based quantum cascade laser grown on Si by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition
This study presents the growth and characterization of an 8.1 μm-emitting, InGaAs/AlInAs/InP-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) formed on an InP-on-Si composite template by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). First, for the composite-template formation, a GaAs buffer layer was grown by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy on a commercial (001) GaP/Si substrate, thus forming a GaAs/GaP/Si template. Next, an InP metamorphic buffer layer (MBL) structure was grown atop the GaAs/GaP/Si template by MOCVD, followed by the MOCVD growth of the full QCL structure. The top-surface morphology of the GaAs/GaP/Si template before and after the InP MBL growth was assessed via atomic force microscopy, over a 100 μm2 area, and no antiphase domains were found. The average threading dislocation density (TDD) for the GaAs/GaP/Si template was found to be ∼1 × 109 cm−2, with a slightly lower defect density of ∼7.9 × 108 cm−2 after the InP MBL growth. The lasing performance of the QCL structure grown on Si was compared to that of its counterpart grown on InP native substrate and found to be quite similar. That is, the threshold-current density of the QCL on Si, for deep-etched ridge-guide devices with uncoated facets, is somewhat lower than that for its counterpart on native InP substrate, 1.50 vs 1.92 kA/cm2, while the maximum output power per facet is 1.64 vs 1.47 W. These results further demonstrate the resilience of QCLs to relatively high residual TDD values.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1806285
NSF-PAR ID:
10439196
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Volume:
123
Issue:
3
ISSN:
0003-6951
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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