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Title: Multi-physics simulations and experimental comparisons for the optical and electrical forces acting on a silica nanoparticle trapped by a double-nanohole plasmonic nanopore sensor
Bimodal optical-electrical data generated when a 20 nm diameter silica (SiO2) nanoparticle was trapped by a plasmonic nanopore sensor were simulated using Multiphysics COMSOL and compared with sensor measurements for closely matching experimental parameters. The nanosensor, employed self-induced back action (SIBA) to optically trap nanoparticles in the center of a double nanohole (DNH) structure on top a solid-state nanopores (ssNP). This SIBA actuated nanopore electrophoresis (SANE) sensor enables simultaneous capture of optical and electrical data generated by several underlying forces acting on the trapped SiO2 nanoparticle: plasmonic optical trapping, electroosmosis, electrophoresis, viscous drag, and heat conduction forces. The Multiphysics simulations enabled dissecting the relative contributions of those forces acting on the nanoparticle as a function of its location above and through the sensor’s ssNP. Comparisons between simulations and experiments demonstrated qualitative similarities in the optical and electrical time-series data generated as the nanoparticle entered and exited from the SANE sensor. These experimental parameter-matched simulations indicated that the competition between optical and electrical forces shifted the trapping equilibrium position close to the top opening of the ssNP, relative to the optical trapping force maximum that was located several nm above. The experimentally estimated minimum for the optical force needed to trap a SiO2 nanoparticle was consistent with corresponding simulation predictions of optical-electrical force balance. The comparison of Multiphysics simulations with experiments improves our understanding of the interplay between optical and electrical forces as a function of nanoparticle position across this plasmonic nanopore sensor.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2022398
NSF-PAR ID:
10444190
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Sensing and biosensing research
Volume:
41
ISSN:
2214-1804
Page Range / eLocation ID:
100581
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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