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Title: MoO3 Interlayer Modification on the Electronic Structure of Co/BP Interface
The modification by molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) buffer layer on the electronic structure between Co and black phosphorus (BP) was investigated with ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the MoO3 buffer layer could effectively prevent the destruction of the outermost BP lattice during the Co deposition, with the symmetry of the lattice remaining maintained. There is a noticeable interfacial charge transfer in addition to the chemical reaction between Co and MoO3. The growth pattern of Co deposited onto the MoO3/BP film is the island growth mode. The observations reveal the significance of a MoO3 buffer layer on the electronic structure between Co and black phosphorus and provide help for the design of high-performance Co/BP-based spintronic devices.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1903962
NSF-PAR ID:
10466094
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Symmetry
Volume:
14
Issue:
11
ISSN:
2073-8994
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2448
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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