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Title: A Framework for Monte-Carlo Tree Search on CPU-FPGA Heterogeneous Platform via on-chip Dynamic Tree Management
Award ID(s):
2009057 2333009
NSF-PAR ID:
10468168
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ACM
Date Published:
Page Range / eLocation ID:
235 to 245
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Monterey CA USA
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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