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Title: Block Copolymers of Polyolefins with Polyacrylates: Analyzing and Improving the Blocking Efficiencies Using MILRad/ATRP Approach
Abstract

Despite their industrial ubiquity, polyolefin‐polyacrylate block copolymers are challenging to synthesize due to the distinct polymerization pathways necessary for respective blocks. This study utilizes MILRad, metal–organic insertion light‐initiated radical polymerization, to synthesize polyolefin‐b‐poly(methyl acrylate) copolymer by combining palladium‐catalyzed insertion–coordination polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Brookhart‐type Pd complexes used for the living polymerization of olefins are homolytically cleaved by blue‐light irradiation, generating polyolefin‐based macroradicals, which are trapped with functional nitroxide derivatives forming ATRP macroinitiators. ATRP in the presence of Cu(0), that is, supplemental activators and reducing agents , is used to polymerize methyl acrylate. An increase in the functionalization efficiency of up to 71% is demonstrated in this study by modifying the light source and optimizing the radical trapping condition. Regardless of the radical trapping efficiency, essentially quantitative chain extension of polyolefin‐Br macroinitiator with acrylates is consistently demonstrated, indicating successful second block formation.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10485795
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Macromolecular Rapid Communications
Volume:
45
Issue:
8
ISSN:
1022-1336
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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