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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 16, 2023
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 27, 2022
  3. Abstract Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived (iPSC) neural cultures offer clinically relevant models of human diseases, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. In situ characterization of the spatial-temporal evolution of cell state in 3D culture and subsequent 2D dissociated culture models based on protein expression levels and localizations is essential to understanding neural cell differentiation, disease state phenotypes, and sample-to-sample variability. Here, we apply PR obe-based I maging for S equential M ultiplexing (PRISM) to facilitate multiplexed imaging with facile, rapid exchange of imaging probes to analyze iPSC-derived cortical and motor neuron cultures that are relevant tomore »psychiatric and neurodegenerative disease models, using over ten protein targets. Our approach permits analysis of cell differentiation, cell composition, and functional marker expression in complex stem-cell derived neural cultures. Furthermore, our approach is amenable to automation, offering in principle the ability to scale-up to dozens of protein targets and samples.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2022
  4. Abstract Wireframe DNA origami assemblies can now be programmed automatically from the top-down using simple wireframe target geometries, or meshes, in 2D and 3D, using either rigid, six-helix bundle (6HB) or more compliant, two-helix bundle (DX) edges. While these assemblies have numerous applications in nanoscale materials fabrication due to their nanoscale spatial addressability and high degree of customization, no easy-to-use graphical user interface software yet exists to deploy these algorithmic approaches within a single, standalone interface. Further, top-down sequence design of 3D DX-based objects previously enabled by DAEDALUS was limited to discrete edge lengths and uniform vertex angles, limiting themore »scope of objects that can be designed. Here, we introduce the open-source software package ATHENA with a graphical user interface that automatically renders single-stranded DNA scaffold routing and staple strand sequences for any target wireframe DNA origami using DX or 6HB edges, including irregular, asymmetric DX-based polyhedra with variable edge lengths and vertices demonstrated experimentally, which significantly expands the set of possible 3D DNA-based assemblies that can be designed. ATHENA also enables external editing of sequences using caDNAno, demonstrated using asymmetric nanoscale positioning of gold nanoparticles, as well as providing atomic-level models for molecular dynamics, coarse-grained dynamics with oxDNA, and other computational chemistry simulation approaches.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available September 11, 2022
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available September 1, 2022
  6. Abstract

    Wireframe DNA origami has emerged as a powerful approach to fabricating nearly arbitrary 2D and 3D geometries at the nanometer-scale. Complex scaffold and staple routing needed to design wireframe DNA origami objects, however, render fully automated, geometry-based sequence design approaches essential for their synthesis. And wireframe DNA origami structural fidelity can be limited by wireframe edges that are composed only of one or two duplexes. Here we introduce a fully automated computational approach that programs 2D wireframe origami assemblies using honeycomb edges composed of six parallel duplexes. These wireframe assemblies show enhanced structural fidelity from electron microscopy-based measurement ofmore »programmed angles compared with identical geometries programmed using dual-duplex edges. Molecular dynamics provides additional theoretical support for the enhanced structural fidelity observed. Application of our top-down sequence design procedure to a variety of complex objects demonstrates its broad utility for programmable 2D nanoscale materials.

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  7. Structural DNA nanotechnology is beginning to emerge as a widely accessible research tool to mechanistically study diverse biophysical processes. Enabled by scaffolded DNA origami in which a long single strand of DNA is weaved throughout an entire target nucleic acid assembly to ensure its proper folding, assemblies of nearly any geometric shape can now be programmed in a fully automatic manner to interface with biology on the 1–100-nm scale. Here, we review the major design and synthesis principles that have enabled the fabrication of a specific subclass of scaffolded DNA origami objects called wireframe assemblies. These objects offer unprecedented controlmore »over the nanoscale organization of biomolecules, including biomolecular copy numbers, presentation on convex or concave geometries, and internal versus external functionalization, in addition to stability in physiological buffer. To highlight the power and versatility of this synthetic structural biology approach to probing molecular and cellular biophysics, we feature its application to three leading areas of investigation: light harvesting and nanoscale energy transport, RNA structural biology, and immune receptor signaling, with an outlook toward unique mechanistic insight that may be gained in these areas in the coming decade.« less