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Creators/Authors contains: "Chen, Zhongzhou"

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  1. We compared students' learning behavior when completing identical online calculus-based physics homework assignments organized in two ways. One was designed for mastery learning where content is divided into smaller units, and students are required to attempt the assessment once before accessing the content. Students can proceed to the next unit after passing the assessment either before or after studying the content. The second is a conventional design in which students first study a set of instructional materials equivalent to several mastery units then complete multiple assessment problems at once. Our major findings are: 1. in the mastery condition, students solvedmore »more problems correctly either immediately after studying the instructional content, or on attempts before accessing the instructional content; 2. for students who solved similar numbers of problems correctly, the mastery condition students spent significantly less time studying compared to the traditional condition students; and 3. students who did not pass mastery units on their initial assessment attempts spent similar amounts of time studying as traditional condition students.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 13, 2021
  2. This study investigates patterns in students' learning and problem-solving behavior as they proceed through a sequence of 10 mastery-based online learning modules and how these patterns correlate with overall course outcome. Students' interaction with each module, as measured by analyzing the platform log data, was categorized into nine different states. The student population was divided into top, middle and bottom cohorts based on their total course credit, and we visualized each cohort's distribution among the nine states over the 10 modules using a series of parallel coordinates graphs. We found that the patterns of interaction were mostly similar on themore »first six modules, but are significantly different on modules 7-10. For the later modules, the top cohort mostly concentrated on the state corresponding to high problem-solving effort after learning, while the majority of the bottom cohort did not access the learning materials after multiple failed attempts.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 13, 2021
  3. We compared students' learning behavior when completing identical online calculus-based physics homework assignments organized in two ways. One was designed for mastery learning where content is divided into smaller units, and students are required to attempt the assessment once before accessing the content. Students can proceed to the next unit after passing the assessment either before or after studying the content. The second is a conventional design in which students first study a set of instructional materials equivalent to several mastery units then complete multiple assessment problems at once. Our major findings are: 1. in the mastery condition, students solvedmore »more problems correctly either immediately after studying the instructional content, or on attempts before accessing the instructional content; 2. for students who solved similar numbers of problems correctly, the mastery condition students spent significantly less time studying compared to the traditional condition students; and 3. students who did not pass mastery units on their initial assessment attempts spent similar amounts of time studying as traditional condition students.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 13, 2021
  4. This poster paper describes the authors’ single-year National Science Foundation (NSF) project DRL-1825007 titled, “DCL: Synthesis and Design Workshop on Digitally-Mediated Team Learning” which has been conducted as one of nine awards within NSF-18-017: Principles for the Design of Digital STEM Learning Environments. Beginning in September 2018, the project conducted the activities herein to deliver a three-day workshop on Digitally-Mediated Team Learning (DMTL) to convene, invigorate, and task interdisciplinary science and engineering researchers, developers, and educators to coalesce the leading strategies for digital team learning. The deliverable of the workshop is a White Paper composed to identify one-year, three-year, andmore »five-year research and practice roadmaps for highly-adaptable environments for computer-supported collaborative learning within STEM curricula. As subject to the chronology of events, highlights of the White Paper’s outcomes will be showcased within the poster itself.« less