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  1. Abstract Molecular interaction networks are powerful resources for molecular discovery. They are increasingly used with machine learning methods to predict biologically meaningful interactions. While deep learning on graphs has dramatically advanced the prediction prowess, current graph neural network (GNN) methods are mainly optimized for prediction on the basis of direct similarity between interacting nodes. In biological networks, however, similarity between nodes that do not directly interact has proved incredibly useful in the last decade across a variety of interaction networks. Here, we present SkipGNN, a graph neural network approach for the prediction of molecular interactions. SkipGNN predicts molecular interactions by not only aggregating information from direct interactions but also from second-order interactions, which we call skip similarity. In contrast to existing GNNs, SkipGNN receives neural messages from two-hop neighbors as well as immediate neighbors in the interaction network and non-linearly transforms the messages to obtain useful information for prediction. To inject skip similarity into a GNN, we construct a modified version of the original network, called the skip graph. We then develop an iterative fusion scheme that optimizes a GNN using both the skip graph and the original graph. Experiments on four interaction networks, including drug–drug, drug–target, protein–protein, and gene–diseasemore »interactions, show that SkipGNN achieves superior and robust performance. Furthermore, we show that unlike popular GNNs, SkipGNN learns biologically meaningful embeddings and performs especially well on noisy, incomplete interaction networks.« less
  2. Wren, Jonathan (Ed.)
    Abstract Summary Accurate prediction of drug–target interactions (DTI) is crucial for drug discovery. Recently, deep learning (DL) models for show promising performance for DTI prediction. However, these models can be difficult to use for both computer scientists entering the biomedical field and bioinformaticians with limited DL experience. We present DeepPurpose, a comprehensive and easy-to-use DL library for DTI prediction. DeepPurpose supports training of customized DTI prediction models by implementing 15 compound and protein encoders and over 50 neural architectures, along with providing many other useful features. We demonstrate state-of-the-art performance of DeepPurpose on several benchmark datasets. Availability and implementation https://github.com/kexinhuang12345/DeepPurpose. Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
  3. Therapeutics machine learning is an emerging field with incredible opportunities for innovatiaon and impact. However, advancement in this field requires formulation of meaningful learning tasks and careful curation of datasets. Here, we introduce Therapeutics Data Commons (TDC), the first unifying platform to systematically access and evaluate machine learning across the entire range of therapeutics. To date, TDC includes 66 AI-ready datasets spread across 22 learning tasks and spanning the discovery and development of safe and effective medicines. TDC also provides an ecosystem of tools and community resources, including 33 data functions and types of meaningful data splits, 23 strategies for systematic model evaluation, 17 molecule generation oracles, and 29 public leaderboards. All resources are integrated and accessible via an open Python library. We carry out extensive experiments on selected datasets, demonstrating that even the strongest algorithms fall short of solving key therapeutics challenges, including real dataset distributional shifts, multi-scale modeling of heterogeneous data, and robust generalization to novel data points. We envision that TDC can facilitate algorithmic and scientific advances and considerably accelerate machine-learning model development, validation and transition into biomedical and clinical implementation. TDC is an open-science initiative available at this https://tdcommons.ai.
  4. Prevailing methods for graphs require abundant label and edge information for learning. When data for a new task are scarce, meta-learning can learn from prior experiences and form much-needed inductive biases for fast adaption to new tasks. Here, we introduce G-Meta, a novel meta-learning algorithm for graphs. G-Meta uses local subgraphs to transfer subgraph-specific information and learn transferable knowledge faster via meta gradients. G-Meta learns how to quickly adapt to a new task using only a handful of nodes or edges in the new task and does so by learning from data points in other graphs or related, albeit disjoint label sets. G-Meta is theoretically justified as we show that the evidence for a prediction can be found in the local subgraph surrounding the target node or edge. Experiments on seven datasets and nine baseline methods show that G-Meta outperforms existing methods by up to 16.3%. Unlike previous methods, G-Meta successfully learns in challenging, few-shot learning settings that require generalization to completely new graphs and never-before-seen labels. Finally, G-Meta scales to large graphs, which we demonstrate on a new Tree-of-Life dataset comprising of 1,840 graphs, a two-orders of magnitude increase in the number of graphs used in prior work.