skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Joshi, Gauri"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Minimax optimization has seen a surge in interest with the advent of modern applications such as GANs, and it is inherently more challenging than simple minimization. The difficulty is exacerbated by the training data residing at multiple edge devices or clients, especially when these clients can have heterogeneous datasets and heterogeneous local computation capabilities. We propose a general federated minimax optimization framework that subsumes such settings and several existing methods like Local SGDA. We show that naive aggregation of model updates made by clients running unequal number of local steps can result in optimizing a mismatched objective function – a phenomenon previously observed in standard federated minimization. To fix this problem, we propose normalizing the client updates by the number of local steps. We analyze the convergence of the proposed algorithm for classes of nonconvex-concave and nonconvex-nonconcave functions and characterize the impact of heterogeneous client data, partial client participation, and heterogeneous local computations. For all the function classes considered, we significantly improve the existing computation and communication complexity results. Experimental results support our theoretical claims. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 30, 2024
  2. We study the problem of communication-efficient distributed vector mean estimation, which is a commonly used subroutine in distributed optimization and Federated Learning (FL). Rand-k sparsification is a commonly used technique to reduce communication cost, where each client sends of its coordinates to the server. However, Rand-k is agnostic to any correlations, that might exist between clients in practical scenarios. The recently proposed Rand-k-Spatial estimator leverages the cross-client correlation information at the server to improve Rand-k's performance. Yet, the performance of Rand-k-Spatial is suboptimal, and improving mean estimation is key to faster convergence in distributed optimization. We propose the Rand-Proj-Spatial estimator with a more flexible encoding-decoding procedure, which generalizes the encoding of Rand- by projecting the client vectors to a random k-dimensional subspace. We utilize Subsampled Randomized Hadamard Transform (SRHT) as the projection matrix and show that Rand-Proj-Spatial with SRHT outperforms Rand-k-Spatial, using the correlation information more efficiently. Furthermore, we propose an approach to incorporate varying degrees of correlation and suggest a practical variant of Rand-Proj-Spatial when the correlation information is not available to the server. Finally, experiments on real-world distributed optimization tasks showcase the superior performance of Rand-Proj-Spatial compared to Rand-k-Spatial and other more sophisticated sparsification techniques. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 20, 2024
  3. In this paper, we consider federated Q-learning, which aims to learn an optimal Q-function by periodically aggregating local Q-estimates trained on local data alone. Focusing on infinite-horizon tabular Markov decision processes, we provide sample complexity guarantees for both the synchronous and asynchronous variants of federated Q-learning. In both cases, our bounds exhibit a linear speedup with respect to the number of agents and sharper dependencies on other salient problem parameters. Moreover, existing approaches to federated Q-learning adopt an equally-weighted averaging of local Q-estimates, which can be highly sub-optimal in the asynchronous setting since the local trajectories can be highly heterogeneous due to different local behavior policies. Existing sample complexity scales inverse proportionally to the minimum entry of the stationary state-action occupancy distributions over all agents, requiring that every agent covers the entire state-action space. Instead, we propose a novel importance averaging algorithm, giving larger weights to more frequently visited state-action pairs. The improved sample complexity scales inverse proportionally to the minimum entry of the average stationary state-action occupancy distribution of all agents, thus only requiring the agents collectively cover the entire state-action space, unveiling the blessing of heterogeneity. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 24, 2024
  4. Federated Averaging (FedAvg) and its variants are the most popular optimization algorithms in federated learning (FL). Previous convergence analyses of FedAvg either assume full client participation or partial client participation where the clients can be uniformly sampled. However, in practical cross-device FL systems, only a subset of clients that satisfy local criteria such as battery status, network connectivity, and maximum participation frequency requirements (to ensure privacy) are available for training at a given time. As a result, client availability follows a natural cyclic pattern. We provide (to our knowledge) the first theoretical framework to analyze the convergence of FedAvg with cyclic client participation with several different client optimizers such as GD, SGD, and shuffled SGD. Our analysis discovers that cyclic client participation can achieve a faster asymptotic convergence rate than vanilla FedAvg with uniform client participation under suitable conditions, providing valuable insights into the design of client sampling protocols. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 23, 2024
  5. Federated Learning (FL) under distributed concept drift is a largely unexplored area. Although concept drift is itself a well-studied phenomenon, it poses particular challenges for FL, because drifts arise staggered in time and space (across clients). Our work is the first to explicitly study data heterogeneity in both dimensions. We first demonstrate that prior solutions to drift adaptation, with their single global model, are ill-suited to staggered drifts, necessitating multiple-model solutions. We identify the problem of drift adaptation as a time-varying clustering problem, and we propose two new clustering algorithms for reacting to drifts based on local drift detection and hierarchical clustering. Empirical evaluation shows that our solutions achieve significantly higher accuracy than existing baselines, and are comparable to an idealized algorithm with oracle knowledge of the ground-truth clustering of clients to concepts at each time step. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 25, 2024
  6. Federated Averaging (FedAvg) remains the most popular algorithm for Federated Learning (FL) optimization due to its simple implementation, stateless nature, and privacy guarantees combined with secure aggregation. Recent work has sought to generalize the vanilla averaging in FedAvg to a generalized gradient descent step by treating client updates as pseudo-gradients and using a server step size. While the use of a server step size has been shown to provide performance improvement theoretically, the practical benefit of the server step size has not been seen in most existing works. In this work, we present FedExP, a method to adaptively determine the server step size in FL based on dynamically varying pseudo-gradients throughout the FL process. We begin by considering the overparameterized convex regime, where we reveal an interesting similarity between FedAvg and the Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) algorithm. We then show how FedExP can be motivated as a novel extension to the extrapolation mechanism that is used to speed up POCS. Our theoretical analysis later also discusses the implications of FedExP in underparameterized and non-convex settings. Experimental results show that FedExP consistently converges faster than FedAvg and competing baselines on a range of realistic FL datasets. 
    more » « less
  7. Federated Learning (FL) under distributed concept drift is a largely unexplored area. Although concept drift is itself a well-studied phenomenon, it poses particular challenges for FL, because drifts arise staggered in time and space (across clients). Our work is the first to explicitly study data heterogeneity in both dimensions. We first demonstrate that prior solutions to drift adaptation, with their single global model, are ill-suited to staggered drifts, necessitating multiple-model solutions. We identify the problem of drift adaptation as a time-varying clustering problem, and we propose two new clustering algorithms for reacting to drifts based on local drift detection and hierarchical clustering. Empirical evaluation shows that our solutions achieve significantly higher accuracy than existing baselines, and are comparable to an idealized algorithm with oracle knowledge of the ground-truth clustering of clients to concepts at each time step. 
    more » « less
  8. We address the problem of slowdown caused by straggling nodes in distributed non-linear computations. Many common non-linear computations can be written as a sum of inexpensive non-linear functions (e.g. Taylor series). Based on this observation, we propose a new class of rateless codes called rateless sum-recovery codes whose aim is to recover the sum of source symbols, without necessarily recovering individual symbols. Source symbols correspond to individual inexpensive functions and each encoded symbol is the sum of a subset of source symbols. Encoded symbols are computed in a distributed fashion and for a computation that can be written as a sum of m inexpensive functions, successful sum-recovery is possible with high probability as long as slightly more than m encoded symbols are received. Our code is rateless, systematic and has sparse parities. Moreover, encoded symbols are constructed by sampling without replacement at individual nodes, thereby making decoding superfluous if the encoded symbols from any node cover all source symbols. We validate our claims through a range of simulations and also discuss open questions for future works. 
    more » « less