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Creators/Authors contains: "Malinowski, Paul"

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  1. Abstract

    In type-II Weyl semimetals (WSMs), the tilting of the Weyl cones leads to the coexistence of electron and hole pockets that touch at the Weyl nodes. These electrons and holes experience the Berry curvature generated by the Weyl nodes, leading to an anomalous Hall effect that is highly sensitive to the Fermi level position. Here we have identified field-induced ferromagnetic MnBi2-xSbxTe4as an ideal type-II WSM with a single pair of Weyl nodes. By employing a combination of quantum oscillations and high-field Hall measurements, we have resolved the evolution of Fermi-surface sections as the Fermi level is tuned across the charge neutrality point, precisely matching the band structure of an ideal type-II WSM. Furthermore, the anomalous Hall conductivity exhibits a heartbeat-like behavior as the Fermi level is tuned across the Weyl nodes, a feature of type-II WSMs that was long predicted by theory. Our work uncovers a large free carrier contribution to the anomalous Hall effect resulting from the unique interplay between the Fermi surface and diverging Berry curvature in magnetic type-II WSMs.

     
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  2. Abstract Fe 1+ y Te 1− x Se x is characterized by its complex magnetic phase diagram and highly orbital-dependent band renormalization. Despite this, the behavior of nematicity and nematic fluctuations, especially for high tellurium concentrations, remains largely unknown. Here we present a study of both B 1 g and B 2 g nematic fluctuations in Fe 1+ y Te 1− x Se x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.53) using the technique of elastoresistivity measurement. We discovered that the nematic fluctuations in two symmetry channels are closely linked to the corresponding spin fluctuations, confirming the intertwined nature of these two degrees of freedom. We also revealed an unusual temperature dependence of the nematic susceptibility, which we attributed to a loss of coherence of the d x y orbital. Our results highlight the importance of orbital differentiation on the nematic properties of iron-based materials. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  3. Abstract

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE), typically observed in ferromagnetic (FM) metals with broken time-reversal symmetry, depends on electronic and magnetic properties. In Co3Sn2-xInxS2, a giant AHE has been attributed to Berry curvature associated with the FM Weyl semimetal phase, yet recent studies report complicated magnetism. We use neutron scattering to determine the spin dynamics and structures as a function ofxand provide a microscopic understanding of the AHE and magnetism interplay. Spin gap and stiffness indicate a contribution from Weyl fermions consistent with the AHE. The magnetic structure evolves fromc-axis ferromagnetism at$$x = 0$$x=0to a canted antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure with reducedc-axis moment and in-plane AFM order at$$x = 0.12$$x=0.12and further reducedc-axis FM moment at$$x = 0.3$$x=0.3. Since noncollinear spins can induce non-zero Berry curvature in real space acting as a fictitious magnetic field, our results revealed another AHE contribution, establishing the impact of magnetism on transport.

     
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  4. Abstract We present evidence that the two-dimensional bulk of monolayer WTe 2 contains electrons and holes bound by Coulomb attraction—excitons—that spontaneously form in thermal equilibrium. On cooling from room temperature to 100 K, the conductivity develops a V-shaped dependence on electrostatic doping, while the chemical potential develops a step at the neutral point. These features are much sharper than is possible in an independent-electron picture, but they can be accounted for if electrons and holes interact strongly and are paired in equilibrium. Our calculations from first principles show that the exciton binding energy is larger than 100 meV and the radius as small as 4 nm, explaining their formation at high temperature and doping levels. Below 100 K, more strongly insulating behaviour is seen, suggesting that a charge-ordered state forms. The observed absence of charge density waves in this state is surprising within an excitonic insulator picture, but we show that it can be explained by the symmetries of the exciton wavefunction. Therefore, in addition to being a topological insulator, monolayer WTe 2 exhibits strong correlations over a wide temperature range. 
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