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Creators/Authors contains: "Murguia-Berthier, Ariadna"

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  1. Abstract Short γ -ray burst (sGRB) jets form in the aftermath of a neutron star merger, drill through disk winds and dynamical ejecta, and extend over four to five orders of magnitude in distance before breaking out of the ejecta. We present the first 3D general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic sGRB simulations to span this enormous scale separation. They feature three possible outcomes: jet+cocoon, cocoon, and neither. Typical sGRB jets break out of the dynamical ejecta if (i) the bound ejecta’s isotropic equivalent mass along the pole at the time of the BH formation is ≲10 −4 M ⊙ , setting a limit on the delay time between the merger and BH formation, otherwise, the jets perish inside the ejecta and leave the jet-inflated cocoon to power a low-luminosity sGRB; (ii) the postmerger remnant disk contains a strong large-scale vertical magnetic field, ≳10 15 G; and (iii) if the jets are weak (≲10 50 erg), the ejecta’s isotropic equivalent mass along the pole must be small (≲10 −2 M ⊙ ). Generally, the jet structure is shaped by the early interaction with disk winds rather than the dynamical ejecta. As long as our jets break out of the ejecta, they retain a significantmore »magnetization (≲1), suggesting that magnetic reconnection is a fundamental property of sGRB emission. The angular structure of the outflow isotropic equivalent energy after breakout consistently features a flat core followed by a steep power-law distribution (slope ≳3), similar to hydrodynamic jets. In the cocoon-only outcome, the dynamical ejecta broadens the outflow angular distribution and flattens it (slope ∼1.5).« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 28, 2023
  2. The engulfment of substellar bodies (SBs) such as brown dwarfs and planets has been invoked as a possible explanation for the presence of SBs orbiting subdwarfs and white dwarfs, rapidly rotating giants, and lithium-rich giants. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the flow in the vicinity of an SB engulfed in a stellar envelope. We model the SB as a rigid body with a reflective boundary because it cannot accrete. This reflective boundary changes the flow morphology to resemble that of engulfed compact objects with outflows. We measure the drag coefficients for the ram pressure and gravitational drag forces acting on the SB, and use them to integrate its trajectory during engulfment. We find that SB engulfment can increase the stellar luminosity of a 1M⊙ star by up to a few orders of magnitude for timescales of up to a few thousand years when the star is ≈10R⊙ and up to a few decades at the tip of the red giant branch. We find that no SBs can eject the envelope of a 1M⊙ star before it evolves to ≈10R⊙ . In contrast, SBs as small as ≈10MJup can eject the envelope at the tip of the red giant branch,more »shrinking their orbits by several orders of magnitude in the process. The numerical framework we introduce here can be used to study the dynamics of planetary engulfment in a simplified setting that captures the physics of the flow at the scale of the SB.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 1, 2023
  3. ABSTRACT The discovery of GRB 170817A, the first unambiguous off-axis short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) arising from a neutron star merger, has challenged our understanding of the angular structure of relativistic jets. Studies of the jet propagation usually assume that the jet is ejected from the central engine with a top-hat structure and its final structure, which determines the observed light curve and spectra, is primarily regulated by the interaction with the nearby environment. However, jets are expected to be produced with a structure that is more complex than a simple top-hat, as shown by global accretion simulations. We present numerical simulations of sGRBs launched with a wide range of initial structures, durations, and luminosities. We follow the jet interaction with the merger remnant wind and compute its final structure at distances ≳1011 cm from the central engine. We show that the final jet structure, as well as the resulting afterglow emission, depends strongly on the initial structure of the jet, its luminosity, and duration. While the initial structure of the jet is preserved for long-lasting sGRBs, it is strongly modified for jets barely making their way through the wind. This illustrates the importance of combining the results of global simulations withmore »propagation studies in order to better predict the expected afterglow signatures from neutron star mergers. Structured jets provide a reasonable description of the GRB 170817A afterglow emission with an off-axis angle θobs ≈ 22.5°.« less
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  5. Abstract The combined detection of a gravitational-wave signal, kilonova, and short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) from GW170817 marked a scientific breakthrough in the field of multimessenger astronomy. But even before GW170817, there have been a number of sGRBs with possible associated kilonova detections. In this work, we re-examine these ‘historical’ sGRB afterglows with a combination of state-of-the-art afterglow and kilonova models. This allows us to include optical/near-infrared synchrotron emission produced by the sGRB as well as ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared emission powered by the radioactive decay of r-process elements (i.e. the kilonova). Fitting the light curves, we derive the velocity and the mass distribution as well as the composition of the ejected material. The posteriors on kilonova parameters obtained from the fit were turned into distributions for the peak magnitude of the kilonova emission in different bands and the time at which this peak occurs. From the sGRB with an associated kilonova, we found that the peak magnitude in H bands falls in the range [−16.2, −13.1] ($95{{\ \rm per\ cent}}$ of confidence) and occurs within $0.8\!-\!3.6\, \rm d$ after the sGRB prompt emission. In g band instead we obtain a peak magnitude in range [−16.8, −12.3] occurring within the first 18 h after themore »sGRB prompt. From the luminosity distributions of GW170817/AT2017gfo, kilonova candidates GRB130603B, GRB050709, and GRB060614 (with the possible inclusion of GRB150101B, GRB050724A, GRB061201, GRB080905A, GRB150424A, and GRB160821B) and the upper limits from all the other sGRBs not associated with any kilonova detection we obtain for the first time a kilonova luminosity distribution in different bands.« less