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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2024
  2. Learning problems commonly exhibit an interesting feedback mechanism wherein the population data reacts to competing decision makers’ actions. This paper formulates a new game theoretic framework for this phenomenon, called multi-player performative prediction. We focus on two distinct solution concepts, namely (i) performatively stable equilibria and (ii) Nash equilibria of the game. The latter equilibria are arguably more informative, but are generally computationally difficult to find since they are solutions of nonmonotone games. We show that under mild assumptions, the performatively stable equilibria can be found efficiently by a variety of algorithms, including repeated retraining and the repeated (stochastic) gradient method. We then establish transparent sufficient conditions for strong monotonicity of the game and use them to develop algorithms for finding Nash equilibria. We investigate derivative free methods and adaptive gradient algorithms wherein each player alternates between learning a parametric description of their distribution and gradient steps on the empirical risk. Synthetic and semi-synthetic numerical experiments illustrate the results. 
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  3. An overarching goal in machine learning is to build a generalizable model with few samples. To this end, overparameterization has been the subject of immense interest to explain the generalization ability of deep nets even when the size of the dataset is smaller than that of the model. While the prior literature focuses on the classical supervised setting, this paper aims to demystify overparameterization for meta-learning. Here we have a sequence of linear-regression tasks and we ask: (1) Given earlier tasks, what is the optimal linear representation of features for a new downstream task? and (2) How many samples do we need to build this representation? This work shows that surprisingly, overparameterization arises as a natural answer to these fundamental meta-learning questions. Specifically, for (1), we first show that learning the optimal representation coincides with the problem of designing a task-aware regularization to promote inductive bias. We leverage this inductive bias to explain how the downstream task actually benefits from overparameterization, in contrast to prior works on few-shot learning. For (2), we develop a theory to explain how feature covariance can implicitly help reduce the sample complexity well below the degrees of freedom and lead to small estimation error. We then integrate these findings to obtain an overall performance guarantee for our meta-learning algorithm. Numerical experiments on real and synthetic data verify our insights on overparameterized meta-learning. 
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