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  1. It is becoming increasingly popular for distributed systems to exploit offload to reduce load on the CPU. Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) offload, in particular, has become popular. However, RDMA still requires CPU intervention for complex offloads that go beyond simple remote memory access. As such, the offload potential is limited and RDMA-based systems usually have to work around such limitations. We present RedN, a principled, practical approach to implementing complex RDMA offloads, without requiring any hardware modifications. Using self-modifying RDMA chains, we lift the existing RDMA verbs interface to a Turing complete set of programming abstractions. We explore what is possible in terms of offload complexity and performance with a commodity RDMA NIC. We show how to integrate these RDMA chains into applications, such as the Memcached key-value store, allowing us to offload complex tasks such as key lookups. RedN can reduce the latency of key-value get operations by up to 2.6× compared to state-of-the-art KV designs that use one-sided RDMA primitives (e.g., FaRM-KV), as well as traditional RPC-over-RDMA approaches. Moreover, compared to these baselines, RedN provides performance isolation and, in the presence of contention, can reduce latency by up to 35× while providing applications with failure resiliency tomore »OS and process crashes.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  2. The adoption of low latency persistent memory modules (PMMs) upends the long-established model of remote storage for distributed file systems. Instead, by colocating computation with PMM storage, we can provide applications with much higher IO performance, sub-second application failover, and strong consistency. To demonstrate this, we built the Assise distributed file system, based on a persistent, replicated coherence protocol that manages client-local PMM as a linearizable and crash-recoverable cache between applications and slower (and possibly remote) storage. Assise maximizes locality for all file IO by carrying out IO on process-local, socket-local, and client-local PMM whenever possible. Assise minimizes coherence overhead by maintaining consistency at IO operation granularity, rather than at fixed block sizes. We compare Assise to Ceph/BlueStore, NFS, and Octopus on a cluster with Intel Optane DC PMMs and SSDs for common cloud applications and benchmarks, such as LevelDB, Postfix, and FileBench. We find that Assise improves write latency up to 22x, throughput up to 56x, fail-over time up to 103x, and scales up to 6x better than its counterparts, while providing stronger consistency semantics.