skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Riteau, Pierre"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Recent advancements have expanded Chameleon’s support for networking experiments by enabling deeply pro- grammable networks spanning wide-areas and controlled by the user. New capabilities include: 1) bring-your-own-controller (BYOC) software defined networking (SDN) and 2) Layer 2 stitching to external testbeds and facilities including stitching between the two Chameleon sites. This paper presents the new networking capabilities of Chameleon along with corresponding experiments that evaluate limitations and features of using SDN in a wide-area environment. The experiments serve both as an evaluation of SDN in a wide-area environment and as a guide for designing advanced networking experiments on Chameleon. 
    more » « less
  2. Recent advancements have expanded Chameleon’s support for networking experiments by enabling deeply pro- grammable networks spanning wide-areas and controlled by the user. New capabilities include: 1) bring-your-own-controller (BYOC) software defined networking (SDN) and 2) Layer 2 stitching to external testbeds and facilities including stitching between the two Chameleon sites. This paper presents the new networking capabilities of Chameleon along with corresponding experiments that evaluate limitations and features of using SDN in a wide-area environment. The experiments serve both as an evaluation of SDN in a wide-area environment and as a guide for designing advanced networking experiments on Chameleon. 
    more » « less
  3. Infrastructure cloud computing allows its clients to allocate on-demand resources, typically consisting of a repre- sentation of a compute node. In general however, there is a need for allocating resources other than nodes and managing them in more controlled ways than simply on demand. This paper generalizes the familiar “compute power on demand” pattern by introducing the abstraction of an allocatable resource, describing its properties, and implementation for different types of resources. We further describe architecture for a generic allocatable resource management service that can be extended to manage diverse types of resources as well as the implementation of this architecture in the OpenStack Blazar service to manage resources ranging from bare-metal compute nodes to network segments. Finally, we provide a usage analysis of this service on the Chameleon testbed and use it to illustrate the effectiveness of resource management methods as well as the need for incentives in usage arbitration. 
    more » « less