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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available September 1, 2024
  2. We propose In-Timestep Remeshing, a fully coupled, adaptive meshing algorithm for contacting elastodynamics where remeshing steps are tightly integrated, implicitly, within the timestep solve. Our algorithm refines and coarsens the domain automatically by measuring physical energy changes within each ongoing timestep solve. This provides consistent, degree-of-freedom-efficient, productive remeshing that, by construction, is physics-aware and so avoids the errors, over-refinements, artifacts, per-example hand-tuning, and instabilities commonly encountered when remeshing with timestepping methods. Our in-timestep computation then ensures that each simulation step's output is both a converged stable solution on the updated mesh and a temporally consistent trajectory with respect to the model and solution of the last timestep. At the same time, the output is guaranteed safe (intersection- and inversion-free) across all operations. We demonstrate applications across a wide range of extreme stress tests with challenging contacts, sharp geometries, extreme compressions, large timesteps, and wide material stiffness ranges - all scenarios well-appreciated to challenge existing remeshing methods. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 1, 2024
  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 17, 2024
  4. Subgrid parameterizations, which represent physical processes occurring below the resolu- tion of current climate models, are an important component in producing accurate, long-term predictions for the climate. A variety of approaches have been tested to design these com- ponents, including deep learning methods. In this work, we evaluate a proof of concept illustrating a multiscale approach to this prediction problem. We train neural networks to predict subgrid forcing values on a testbed model and examine improvements in prediction accuracy that can be obtained by using additional information in both fine-to-coarse and coarse-to-fine directions. 
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  5. We introduce a novel approach to describe mesh generation, mesh adaptation, and geometric modeling algorithms relying on changing mesh connectivity using a high-level abstraction. The main motivation is to enable easy customization and development of these algorithms via a declarative specification consisting of a set of per-element invariants, operation scheduling, and attribute transfer for each editing operation. We demonstrate that widely used algorithms editing surfaces and volumes can be compactly expressed with our abstraction, and their implementation within our framework is simple, automatically parallelizable on shared-memory architectures, and with guaranteed satisfaction of the prescribed invariants. These algorithms are readable and easy to customize for specific use cases. We introduce a software library implementing this abstraction and providing automatic shared-memory parallelization. 
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