skip to main content


Search for: All records

Award ID contains: 2014862

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Abstract

    Graph matching algorithms attempt to find the best correspondence between the nodes of two networks. These techniques have been used to match individual neurons in nanoscale connectomes—in particular, to find pairings of neurons across hemispheres. However, since graph matching techniques deal with two isolated networks, they have only utilized the ipsilateral (same hemisphere) subgraphs when performing the matching. Here, we present a modification to a state-of-the-art graph matching algorithm that allows it to solve what we call the bisected graph matching problem. This modification allows us to leverage the connections between the brain hemispheres when predicting neuron pairs. Via simulations and experiments on real connectome datasets, we show that this approach improves matching accuracy when sufficient edge correlation is present between the contralateral (between hemisphere) subgraphs. We also show how matching accuracy can be further improved by combining our approach with previously proposed extensions to graph matching, which utilize edge types and previously known neuron pairings. We expect that our proposed method will improve future endeavors to accurately match neurons across hemispheres in connectomes, and be useful in other applications where the bisected graph matching problem arises.

     
    more » « less
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2024
  3. INTRODUCTION Eukaryotes contain a highly conserved signaling pathway that becomes rapidly activated when adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels decrease, as happens during conditions of nutrient shortage or mitochondrial dysfunction. The adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated within minutes of energetic stress and phosphorylates a limited number of substrates to biochemically rewire metabolism from an anabolic state to a catabolic state to restore metabolic homeostasis. AMPK also promotes prolonged metabolic adaptation through transcriptional changes, decreasing biosynthetic genes while increasing expression of genes promoting lysosomal and mitochondrial biogenesis. The transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a well-appreciated effector of AMPK-dependent signals, but many of the molecular details of how AMPK controls these processes remain unknown. RATIONALE The requirement of AMPK and its specific downstream targets that control aspects of the transcriptional adaptation of metabolism remain largely undefined. We performed time courses examining gene expression changes after various mitochondrial stresses in wild-type (WT) or AMPK knockout cells. We hypothesized that a previously described interacting protein of AMPK, folliculin-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1), may be involved in how AMPK promotes increases in gene expression after metabolic stress. FNIP1 forms a complex with the protein folliculin (FLCN), together acting as a guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–activating protein (GAP) for RagC. The FNIP1-FLCN complex has emerged as an amino acid sensor to the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), involved in how amino acids control TFEB activation. We therefore examined whether AMPK may regulate FNIP1 to dominantly control TFEB independently of amino acids. RESULTS AMPK was found to govern expression of a core set of genes after various mitochondrial stresses. Hallmark features of this response were activation of TFEB and increases in the transcription of genes specifying lysosomal and mitochondrial biogenesis. AMPK directly phosphorylated five conserved serine residues in FNIP1, suppressing the function of the FLCN-FNIP1 GAP complex, which resulted in dissociation of RagC and mTOR from the lysosome, promoting nuclear translocation of TFEB even in the presence of amino acids. FNIP1 phosphorylation was required for AMPK to activate TFEB and for subsequent increases in peroxisome proliferation–activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) and estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) mRNAs. Cells in which the five serines in FNIP1 were mutated to alanine were unable to increase lysosomal and mitochondrial gene expression programs after treatment with mitochondrial poisons or AMPK activators despite the presence and normal regulation of all other substrates of AMPK. By contrast, neither AMPK nor its control of FNIP1 were needed for activation of TFEB after amino acid withdrawal, illustrating the specificity to energy-limited conditions. CONCLUSION Our data establish FNIP1 as the long-sought substrate of AMPK that controls TFEB translocation to the nucleus, defining AMPK phosphorylation of FNIP1 as a singular event required for increased lysosomal and mitochondrial gene expression programs after metabolic stresses. This study also illuminates the larger biological question of how mitochondrial damage triggers a temporal response of repair and replacement of damaged mitochondria: Within early hours, AMPK-FNIP1–activated TFEB induces a wave of lysosome and autophagy genes to promote degradation of damaged mitochondria, and a few hours later, TFEB–up-regulated PGC1⍺ and ERR⍺ promote expression of a second wave of genes specifying mitochondrial biogenesis. These insights open therapeutic avenues for several common diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, ranging from neurodegeneration to type 2 diabetes to cancer. Mitochondrial damage activates AMPK to phosphorylate FNIP1, stimulating TFEB translocation to the nucleus and sequential waves of lysosomal and mitochondrial biogenesis. After mitochondrial damage, activated AMPK phosphorylates FNIP1 (1), causing inhibition of FLCN-FNIP1 GAP activity (2). This leads to accumulation of RagC in its GTP-bound form, causing dissociation of RagC, mTORC1, and TFEB from the lysosome (3). TFEB is therefore not phosphorylated and translocates to the nucleus, inducing transcription of lysosomal or autophagy genes, with parallel increases in NT-PGC1α mRNA (4), which, in concert with ERRα (5), subsequently induces mitochondrial biogenesis (6). CCCP, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; CLEAR, coordinated lysosomal expression and regulation; GDP, guanosine diphosphate; P, phosphorylation. [Figure created using BioRender] 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 21, 2024
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 20, 2024
  5. Morphology and function of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), and corresponding working memory performance, are affected early in the aging process, but nearly half of aged individuals are spared of working memory deficits. Translationally relevant model systems are critical for determining the neurobiological drivers of this variability. The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is advantageous as a model for these investigations because, as a non-human primate, marmosets have a clearly defined dlPFC that enables measurement of prefrontal-dependent cognitive functions, and their short (∼10 year) lifespan facilitates longitudinal studies of aging. Previously, we characterized working memory capacity in a cohort of marmosets that collectively covered the lifespan, and found age-related working memory impairment. We also found a remarkable degree of heterogeneity in performance, similar to that found in humans. Here, we tested the hypothesis that changes to synaptic ultrastructure that affect synaptic efficacy stratify marmosets that age with cognitive impairment from those that age without cognitive impairment. We utilized electron microscopy to visualize synapses in the marmoset dlPFC and measured the sizes of boutons, presynaptic mitochondria, and synapses. We found that coordinated scaling of the sizes of synapses and mitochondria with their associated boutons is essential for intact working memory performance in aged marmosets. Further, lack of synaptic scaling, due to a remarkable failure of synaptic mitochondria to scale with presynaptic boutons, selectively underlies age-related working memory impairment. We posit that this decoupling results in mismatched energy supply and demand, leading to impaired synaptic transmission. We also found that aged marmosets have fewer synapses in dlPFC than young, though the severity of synapse loss did not predict whether aging occurred with or without cognitive impairment. This work identifies a novel mechanism of synapse dysfunction that stratifies marmosets that age with cognitive impairment from those that age without cognitive impairment. The process by which synaptic scaling is regulated is yet unknown and warrants future investigation. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 12, 2024
  6. Comparing connectomes can help explain how neural connectivity is related to genetics, disease, development, learning, and behavior. However, making statistical inferences about the significance and nature of differences between two networks is an open problem, and such analysis has not been extensively applied to nanoscale connectomes. Here, we investigate this problem via a case study on the bilateral symmetry of a larval Drosophila brain connectome. We translate notions of ‘bilateral symmetry’ to generative models of the network structure of the left and right hemispheres, allowing us to test and refine our understanding of symmetry. We find significant differences in connection probabilities both across the entire left and right networks and between specific cell types. By rescaling connection probabilities or removing certain edges based on weight, we also present adjusted definitions of bilateral symmetry exhibited by this connectome. This work shows how statistical inferences from networks can inform the study of connectomes, facilitating future comparisons of neural structures. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 28, 2024
  7. INTRODUCTION A brainwide, synaptic-resolution connectivity map—a connectome—is essential for understanding how the brain generates behavior. However because of technological constraints imaging entire brains with electron microscopy (EM) and reconstructing circuits from such datasets has been challenging. To date, complete connectomes have been mapped for only three organisms, each with several hundred brain neurons: the nematode C. elegans , the larva of the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis , and of the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii . Synapse-resolution circuit diagrams of larger brains, such as insects, fish, and mammals, have been approached by considering select subregions in isolation. However, neural computations span spatially dispersed but interconnected brain regions, and understanding any one computation requires the complete brain connectome with all its inputs and outputs. RATIONALE We therefore generated a connectome of an entire brain of a small insect, the larva of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This animal displays a rich behavioral repertoire, including learning, value computation, and action selection, and shares homologous brain structures with adult Drosophila and larger insects. Powerful genetic tools are available for selective manipulation or recording of individual neuron types. In this tractable model system, hypotheses about the functional roles of specific neurons and circuit motifs revealed by the connectome can therefore be readily tested. RESULTS The complete synaptic-resolution connectome of the Drosophila larval brain comprises 3016 neurons and 548,000 synapses. We performed a detailed analysis of the brain circuit architecture, including connection and neuron types, network hubs, and circuit motifs. Most of the brain’s in-out hubs (73%) were postsynaptic to the learning center or presynaptic to the dopaminergic neurons that drive learning. We used graph spectral embedding to hierarchically cluster neurons based on synaptic connectivity into 93 neuron types, which were internally consistent based on other features, such as morphology and function. We developed an algorithm to track brainwide signal propagation across polysynaptic pathways and analyzed feedforward (from sensory to output) and feedback pathways, multisensory integration, and cross-hemisphere interactions. We found extensive multisensory integration throughout the brain and multiple interconnected pathways of varying depths from sensory neurons to output neurons forming a distributed processing network. The brain had a highly recurrent architecture, with 41% of neurons receiving long-range recurrent input. However, recurrence was not evenly distributed and was especially high in areas implicated in learning and action selection. Dopaminergic neurons that drive learning are amongst the most recurrent neurons in the brain. Many contralateral neurons, which projected across brain hemispheres, were in-out hubs and synapsed onto each other, facilitating extensive interhemispheric communication. We also analyzed interactions between the brain and nerve cord. We found that descending neurons targeted a small fraction of premotor elements that could play important roles in switching between locomotor states. A subset of descending neurons targeted low-order post-sensory interneurons likely modulating sensory processing. CONCLUSION The complete brain connectome of the Drosophila larva will be a lasting reference study, providing a basis for a multitude of theoretical and experimental studies of brain function. The approach and computational tools generated in this study will facilitate the analysis of future connectomes. Although the details of brain organization differ across the animal kingdom, many circuit architectures are conserved. As more brain connectomes of other organisms are mapped in the future, comparisons between them will reveal both common and therefore potentially optimal circuit architectures, as well as the idiosyncratic ones that underlie behavioral differences between organisms. Some of the architectural features observed in the Drosophila larval brain, including multilayer shortcuts and prominent nested recurrent loops, are found in state-of-the-art artificial neural networks, where they can compensate for a lack of network depth and support arbitrary, task-dependent computations. Such features could therefore increase the brain’s computational capacity, overcoming physiological constraints on the number of neurons. Future analysis of similarities and differences between brains and artificial neural networks may help in understanding brain computational principles and perhaps inspire new machine learning architectures. The connectome of the Drosophila larval brain. The morphologies of all brain neurons, reconstructed from a synapse-resolution EM volume, and the synaptic connectivity matrix of an entire brain. This connectivity information was used to hierarchically cluster all brains into 93 cell types, which were internally consistent based on morphology and known function. 
    more » « less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 10, 2024
  8. Activation of voltage-gated calcium channels at presynaptic terminals leads to local increases in calcium and the fusion of synaptic vesicles containing neurotransmitter. Presynaptic output is a function of the density of calcium channels, the dynamic properties of the channel, the distance to docked vesicles, and the release probability at the docking site. We demonstrate that at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions two different classes of voltage-gated calcium channels, CaV2 and CaV1, mediate the release of distinct pools of synaptic vesicles. CaV2 channels are concentrated in densely packed clusters ~250 nm in diameter with the active zone proteins Neurexin, α-Liprin, SYDE, ELKS/CAST, RIM-BP, α-Catulin, and MAGI1. CaV2 channels are colocalized with the priming protein UNC-13L and mediate the fusion of vesicles docked within 33 nm of the dense projection. CaV2 activity is amplified by ryanodine receptor release of calcium from internal stores, triggering fusion up to 165 nm from the dense projection. By contrast, CaV1 channels are dispersed in the synaptic varicosity, and are colocalized with UNC-13S. CaV1 and ryanodine receptors are separated by just 40 nm, and vesicle fusion mediated by CaV1 is completely dependent on the ryanodine receptor. Distinct synaptic vesicle pools, released by different calcium channels, could be used to tune the speed, voltage-dependence, and quantal content of neurotransmitter release. 
    more » « less
  9. Abstract We present an auxiliary learning task for the problem of neuron segmentation in electron microscopy volumes. The auxiliary task consists of the prediction of local shape descriptors (LSDs), which we combine with conventional voxel-wise direct neighbor affinities for neuron boundary detection. The shape descriptors capture local statistics about the neuron to be segmented, such as diameter, elongation, and direction. On a study comparing several existing methods across various specimen, imaging techniques, and resolutions, auxiliary learning of LSDs consistently increases segmentation accuracy of affinity-based methods over a range of metrics. Furthermore, the addition of LSDs promotes affinity-based segmentation methods to be on par with the current state of the art for neuron segmentation (flood-filling networks), while being two orders of magnitudes more efficient—a critical requirement for the processing of future petabyte-sized datasets. 
    more » « less