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Title: Building the SLATE Platform
We describe progress on building the SLATE (Services Layer at the Edge) platform. The high level goal of SLATE is to facilitate creation of multi-institutional science computing systems by augmenting the canonical Science DMZ pattern with a generic, "programmable", secure and trusted underlayment platform. This platform permits hosting of advanced container-centric services needed for higher-level capabilities such as data transfer nodes, software and data caches, workflow services and science gateway components. SLATE uses best-of-breed data center virtualization and containerization components, and where available, software defined networking, to enable distributed automation of deployment and service lifecycle management tasks by domain experts. As such it will simplify creation of scalable platforms that connect research teams, institutions and resources to accelerate science while reducing operational costs and development cycle times.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1724821
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10064984
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Practice and Experience on Advanced Research Computing
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 7
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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