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Title: Multi-Axis Voxel-Based CNC Machining of Centrifugal Compressor Assemblies
The use of computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) software is essential in the rapid production of high-quality computer numerical control (CNC) machining toolpaths for complex parts. Typical CAM software relies on analytical representations of part geometry, where curves and surfaces are described by parametric functions. This paper proposes the use of a novel way to represent part geometry known as a voxel model. A voxel model uses a three-dimensional array of small cubes to represent a part volume; these cubes, or voxels, are the three-dimensional analog of two-dimensional pixels in an image. The use of voxels for a CAM application enables higher surface complexity, simplified collision checking, and more robust analysis of material removal than would be possible with typical parametric CAM. The unique capabilities of the voxel-based CAM approach described in this paper enable rapid production of high-quality 5-axis toolpaths for machining complex parts, such as the centrifugal compressor assembly that is presented in this work.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1631803 1646013
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10066759
Journal Name:
American Helicopter Society Forum 74
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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