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Title: Shuffles and Circuits
We introduce an abstract and strong model of massively parallel computation, where essentially the only restrictions are that the “fan-in” of each machine is limited to s bits, where s is smaller than the input size n, and that computation proceeds in synchronized rounds, with no communication between different machines within a round. Lower bounds on round complexity in this model apply to every computing platform that shares the most basic design principles of MapReduce-type systems. We apply a variant of the “polynomial method” to capture restrictions obeyed by all such massively parallel computations. This connection allows us to translate a lower bound on the (approximate) polynomial degree of a Boolean function to a lower bound on the round complexity of every (randomized) massively parallel computation of that function. These lower bounds apply even in the “unbounded width” version of our model, where the number of machines can be arbitrarily large. As one example of our general results, computing any non-trivial monotone graph property — such as any of the standard connectivity problems — requires a super-constant number of rounds when every machine can accept only a sub-polynomial (in n) number of input bits s. This lower bound constitutes significant progress on a major open question in the area,  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1813188
NSF-PAR ID:
10096606
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of the ACM
Volume:
65
Issue:
6
ISSN:
1557-735X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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