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Title: The ASAS-SN catalogue of variable stars – IV. Periodic variables in the APOGEE survey
ABSTRACT We explore the synergy between photometric and spectroscopic surveys by searching for periodic variable stars among the targets observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) using photometry from the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN). We identified 1924 periodic variables among more than $258\, 000$ APOGEE targets; 465 are new discoveries. We homogeneously classified 430 eclipsing and ellipsoidal binaries, 139 classical pulsators (Cepheids, RR Lyrae, and δ Scuti), 719 long-period variables (pulsating red giants), and 636 rotational variables. The search was performed using both visual inspection and machine learning techniques. The light curves were also modelled with the damped random walk stochastic process. We find that the median [Fe/H] of variable objects is lower by 0.3 dex than that of the overall APOGEE sample. Eclipsing binaries and ellipsoidal variables are shifted to a lower median [Fe/H] by 0.2 dex. Eclipsing binaries and rotational variables exhibit significantly broader spectral lines than the rest of the sample. We make ASAS-SN light curves for all the APOGEE stars publicly available and provide parameters for the variable objects.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1814440 1908952 1908570 1515927
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10106092
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
487
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
5932 to 5945
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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