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Title: Information Processing Capability of Soft Continuum Arms
Soft Continuum arms, such as trunk and tentacle robots, can be considered as the “dual” of traditional rigid-bodied robots in terms of manipulability, degrees of freedom, and compliance. Introduced two decades ago, continuum arms have not yet realized their full potential, and largely remain as laboratory curiosities. The reasons for this lag rest upon their inherent physical features such as high compliance which contribute to their complex control problems that no research has yet managed to surmount. Recently, reservoir computing has been suggested as a way to employ the body dynamics as a computational resource toward implementing compliant body control. In this paper, as a first step, we investigate the information processing capability of soft continuum arms. We apply input signals of varying amplitude and bandwidth to a soft continuum arm and generate the dynamic response for a large number of trials. These data is aggregated and used to train the readout weights to implement a reservoir computing scheme. Results demonstrate that the information processing capability varies across input signal bandwidth and amplitude. These preliminary results demonstrate that soft continuum arms have optimal bandwidth and amplitude where one can implement reservoir computing.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1718755
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10109164
Journal Name:
2019 2nd IEEE International Conference on Soft Robotics (RoboSoft)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
441 to 447
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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