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Title: Ultra-fast robust compressive sensing based on memristor crossbars
In this paper, we propose a new approach for robust compressive sensing (CS) using memristor crossbars that are constructed by recently invented memristor devices. The exciting features of a memristor crossbar, such as high density, low power and great scalability, make it a promising candidate to perform large-scale matrix operations. To apply memristor crossbars to solve a robust CS problem, the alternating directions method of multipliers (ADMM) is employed to split the original problem into subproblems that involve the solution of systems of linear equations. A system of linear equations can then be solved using memristor crossbars with astonishing O(1) time complexity. We also study the impact of hardware variations on the memristor crossbar based CS solver from both theoretical and practical points of view. The resulting overall complexity is given by O(n), which achieves O(n2.5) speed-up compared to the state-of-the-art software approach. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS solver.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1637559
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10110069
Journal Name:
2017 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1133 to 1137
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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