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Title: Promoting a Socially Relevant, Interdisciplinary Approach to Science
Promoting Students Engaging In Scientific and Mathematical Interdisciplinary Collaborations (SEISMIC) requires careful thought. At Bridgewater State University, teams of SEISMIC Scholars are supported by an NSF S-STEM grant for low-income, academically talent STEM majors. SEISMIC Scholars engage throughout a three-year period in a series of humanities, social-science, service learning and STEM research courses that explicitly help Scholars frame their studies of Science and Mathematics as socially relevant and fundamentally interdisciplinary. This poster will report on the structure of the SEISMIC courses, providing examples of assignments and activities, all of which help to tie students together in a community that views Science as socially relevant and culturally informed.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1643475
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10130642
Journal Name:
Transforming STEM Higher Education
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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