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Title: StoryTime: eliciting preferences from children for book recommendations
We present StoryTime, a book recommender for children. Our web-based recommender is co-designed with children and uses images to elicit their preferences. By building on existing solutions related to both visual interfaces and book recommendation strategies for children, StoryTime can generate suggestions without historical data or adult guidance. We discuss the benefits of StoryTime as a starting point for further research exploring the cold start problem, incorporating historical data, and needs related to children as a complex audience to enhance the recommendation process.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1751278
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10133610
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 13th ACM Conference on Recommender Systems
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
544 to 545
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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