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Title: Hierarchical chemomechanical encoding of multi-responsive hydrogel actuators via 3D printing
Inspired by nature, we herein demonstrate a family of multi-responsive hydrogel-based actuators that are encoded with anisotropic swelling behavior to provide rapid and controllable motion. Fabrication of the proposed anisotropy-encoded hydrogel actuators relies on the high resolution stereolithography 3D printing of functionally graded structures made of discrete layers having different volume expansion properties. Three separate synthetic strategies based on (i) asymmetrical distribution of a layer's surface area to volume ratio via mechanical design, (ii) crosslinking density via UV photo-exposure, or (iii) chemical composition via resin vat exchange have been accordingly demonstrated for developing very smooth gradients within the printed hydrogel-based actuator. Our chemomechanical programming enables fast, reversible, repeatable and multimodal bending actuation in response to any immediate environmental change ( i.e. based on osmotic pressure, temperature and pH) from a single printed structure.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1719875
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10148500
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Volume:
7
Issue:
25
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
15395 to 15403
ISSN:
2050-7488
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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