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Title: A Potential Energy Shaping Controller with Ground Reaction Force Feedback for a Multi-Activity Knee-Ankle Exoskeleton
This paper presents the design and implementation of a novel multi-activity control strategy for a backdrivable knee-ankle exoskeleton. Traditionally, exoskeletons have used trajectory-based control of highly geared actuators for complete motion assistance. In contrast, we develop a potential energy shaping controller with ground reaction force (GRF) feedback that facilitates multi-activity assistance from a backdrivable exoskeleton without prescribing pre-defined kinematics. Although potential energy shaping was previously implemented in an exoskeleton to reduce the user’s perceived gravity, this model-based approach assumes the stance leg is fully loaded with the weight of the user, resulting in excessive control torques as weight transfers to the contralateral leg during double support. The presented approach uses GRF feedback to taper the torque control output for any activity involving multiple supports, leading to a closer match with normative joint moments in simulations based on pre-recorded human data during level walking. To implement this strategy, we present a custom foot force sensor that provides GRF feedback to the previously designed exoskeleton. Finally, results from an able-bodied human subject experiment demonstrate that the exoskeleton is able to reduce muscular activation of the primary muscles related to the knee and ankle joints during sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, level walking, and stair climbing.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1949869 1652514
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10157185
Journal Name:
2020 8th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference for Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
997 to 1003
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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