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Title: Multiview Supervision By Registration
This paper presents a semi-supervised learning framework to train a keypoint detector using multiview image streams given the limited number of labeled instances (typically <4%). We leverage three self-supervisionary signals in multiview tracking to utilize the unlabeled data: (1) a keypoint in one view can be supervised by other views via epipolar geometry; (2) a keypoint detection must be consistent across time; (3) a visible keypoint in one view is likely to be visible in the adjacent view. We design a new end-toend network that can propagate these self-supervisionary signals across the unlabeled data from the labeled data in a differentiable manner. We show that our approach outperforms existing detectors including DeepLabCut tailored to the keypoint detection of non-human species such as monkeys, dogs, and mice.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1846031
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10159643
Journal Name:
IEEE Winter Conference on Applications of Computer Vision
ISSN:
2472-6796
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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