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Title: Weighted Additive Spanners
A spanner of a graph G is a subgraph H that approximately preserves shortest path distances in G. Spanners are commonly applied to compress computation on metric spaces corresponding to weighted input graphs. Classic spanner constructions can seamlessly handle edge weights, so long as error is measured multiplicatively. In this work, we investigate whether one can similarly extend constructions of spanners with purely additive error to weighted graphs. These extensions are not immediate, due to a key lemma about the size of shortest path neighborhoods that fails for weighted graphs. Despite this, we recover a suitable amortized version, which lets us prove direct extensions of classic +2 and +4 unweighted spanners (both all-pairs and pairwise) to +2W and +4W weighted spanners, where W is the maximum edge weight. Specifically, we show that a weighted graph G contains all-pairs (pairwise) +2W and +4W weighted spanners of size O(n3/2) and O(n7/5) (O(np1/3) and O(np2/7)) respectively. For a technical reason, the +6 unweighted spanner becomes a +8W weighted spanner; closing this error gap is an interesting remaining open problem. That is, we show that G contains all-pairs (pairwise) +8W weighted spanners of size O(n4/3) (O(np1/4)).
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1712119 1740858
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10179488
Journal Name:
46th International Workshop on Graph-Theoretic Concepts in Computer Science (WG)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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