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Title: Strong Metric (Sub)regularity of Karush–Kuhn–Tucker Mappings for Piecewise Linear-Quadratic Convex-Composite Optimization and the Quadratic Convergence of Newton’s Method
This work concerns the local convergence theory of Newton and quasi-Newton methods for convex-composite optimization: where one minimizes an objective that can be written as the composition of a convex function with one that is continuiously differentiable. We focus on the case in which the convex function is a potentially infinite-valued piecewise linear-quadratic function. Such problems include nonlinear programming, mini-max optimization, and estimation of nonlinear dynamics with non-Gaussian noise as well as many modern approaches to large-scale data analysis and machine learning. Our approach embeds the optimality conditions for convex-composite optimization problems into a generalized equation. We establish conditions for strong metric subregularity and strong metric regularity of the corresponding set-valued mappings. This allows us to extend classical convergence of Newton and quasi-Newton methods to the broader class of nonfinite valued piecewise linear-quadratic convex-composite optimization problems. In particular, we establish local quadratic convergence of the Newton method under conditions that parallel those in nonlinear programming.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1514559
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10187912
Journal Name:
Mathematics of Operations Research
Volume:
45
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1164 to 1192
ISSN:
0364-765X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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