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Title: Extending the Frontier of Quantum Computers with Qutrits
We advocate for a fundamentally different way to perform quantum computation by using three-level qutrits instead of qubits. In particular, we substantially reduce the resource requirements of quantum computations by exploiting a third state for temporary variables (ancilla) in quantum circuits. Past work with qutrits has demonstrated only constant factor improvements, owing to the lg(3) binary-to-ternary compression factor. We present a novel technique using qutrits to achieve a logarithmic runtime decomposition of the Generalized Toffoli gate using no ancilla - an exponential improvement over the best qubit-only equivalent. Our approach features a 70× improvement in total two-qudit gate count over the qubit-only decomposition. This results in improvements for important algorithms for arithmetic and QRAM. Simulation results under realistic noise models indicate over 90% mean reliability (fidelity) for our circuit, versus under 30% for the qubit-only baseline. These results suggest that qutrits offer a promising path toward extending the frontier of quantum computers.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1730449 1818914
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10191000
Journal Name:
IEEE Micro
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 1
ISSN:
0272-1732
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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