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This content will become publicly available on December 7, 2021

Title: Trust in 5G Open RANs through Machine Learning: RF Fingerprinting on the POWDER PAWR Platform
5G and open radio access networks (Open RANs) will result in vendor-neutral hardware deployment that will require additional diligence towards managing security risks. This new paradigm will allow the same network infrastructure to support virtual network slices for transmit different waveforms, such as 5G New Radio, LTE, WiFi, at different times. In this multi- vendor, multi-protocol/waveform setting, we propose an additional physical layer authentication method that detects a specific emitter through a technique called as RF fingerprinting. Our deep learning approach uses convolutional neural networks augmented with triplet loss, where examples of similar/dissimilar signal samples are shown to the classifier over the training duration. We demonstrate the feasibility of RF fingerprinting base stations over the large-scale over-the-air experimental POWDER platform in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Using real world datasets, we show how our approach overcomes the challenges posed by changing channel conditions and protocol choices with 99.86% detection accuracy for different training and testing days.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1923789
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10193343
Journal Name:
IEEE Global Communications Conference
ISSN:
2576-6813
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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