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Title: Design and Modeling of a Continuously Tunable Stiffness Arm for Safe Physical Human–Robot Interaction
Abstract To reduce injury in physical human–robot interactions (pHRIs), a common practice is to introduce compliance to joints or arm of a robotic manipulator. In this paper, we present a robotic arm made of parallel guided beams whose stiffness can be continuously tuned by morphing the shape of the cross section through two four-bar linkages actuated by servo motors. An analytical lateral stiffness model is derived based on the pseudo-rigid-body model and validated by experiments. A physical prototype of a three-armed manipulator is built. Extensive stiffness and impact tests are conducted, and the results show that the stiffness of the robotic arm can be changed up to 3.6 times at a morphing angle of 37 deg. At an impact velocity of 2.2 m/s, the peak acceleration has a decrease of 19.4% and a 28.57% reduction of head injury criteria (HIC) when the arm is tuned from the high stiffness mode to the low stiffness mode. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility to reduce impact injury by introducing compliance into the robotic link and that the compliant link solution could be an alternative approach for addressing safety concerns of physical human–robot interactions.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1637656
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10197582
Journal Name:
Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics
Volume:
12
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1942-4302
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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