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Title: Optical analog of valley Hall effect of 2D excitons in hyperbolic metamaterial

The robust spin and momentum valley locking of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors makes the valley degree of freedom of great utility for functional optoelectronic devices. Owing to the difference in optical selection rules for the different valleys, these valley electrons can be addressed optically. The electrons and excitons in these materials exhibit the valley Hall effect, where the carriers from specific valleys are directed to different directions under electrical or thermal bias. Here we report the optical analog of valley Hall effect, where the light emission from the valley-polarized excitons in a monolayerWS2propagates in different directions owing to the preferential coupling of excitonic emission to the high momentum states of the hyperbolic metamaterial. The experimentally observed effects are corroborated with theoretical modeling of excitonic emission in the near field of hyperbolic media. The demonstration of the optical valley Hall effect using a bulk artificial photonic media without the need for nanostructuring opens the possibility of realizing valley-based excitonic circuits operating at room temperature.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1709996
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10209220
Journal Name:
Optica
Volume:
8
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 50
ISSN:
2334-2536
Publisher:
Optical Society of America
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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