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Title: Network Capabilities for the HL-LHC Era
High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments rely on the networks as one of the critical parts of their infrastructure both within the participating laboratories and sites as well as globally to interconnect the sites, data centres and experiments instrumentation. Network virtualisation and programmable networks are two key enablers that facilitate agile, fast and more economical network infrastructures as well as service development, deployment and provisioning. Adoption of these technologies by HEP sites and experiments will allow them to design more scalable and robust networks while decreasing the overall cost and improving the effectiveness of the resource utilization. The primary challenge we currently face is ensuring that WLCG and its constituent collaborations will have the networking capabilities required to most effectively exploit LHC data for the lifetime of the LHC. In this paper we provide a high level summary of the HEPiX NFV Working Group report that explored some of the novel network capabilities that could potentially be deployment in time for HL-LHC.
Authors:
;
Editors:
Doglioni, C.; Kim, D.; Stewart, G.A.; Silvestris, L.; Jackson, P.; Kamleh, W.
Award ID(s):
1836650
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10257002
Journal Name:
EPJ Web of Conferences
Volume:
245
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
07051
ISSN:
2100-014X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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