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Title: How Do the Purcell Factor, the Q ‐Factor, and the Beta Factor Affect the Laser Threshold?
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1830886 1856515
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10274030
Journal Name:
Laser & Photonics Reviews
Volume:
15
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2000250
ISSN:
1863-8880
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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