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Title: Phase transitions in colloids under microgravity
Research on colloids is motivated by several factors. They can be used to answer fundamental questions related to the assembly of materials, and they have many potential applications in electronics, photonics, and life sciences. However, the rich variety of colloidal structures observed on the Earth can be influenced by the effects of gravity, which leads to particles settling and the motion of the surrounding fluid. To suppress the gravity effects, experiments on concentrated colloids of spherical and ellipsoidal fluorescent particles were carried out aboard the International Space Station. The particles were suspended in a decalin/tetralin mixture to match the particle refractive index. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the particle behavior. The work was supported by the NSF CBET grants 1832260 and 1832291 and the NASA grant 80NSSC19K1655.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1832260
NSF-PAR ID:
10275502
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
American Physical Society March Meeting 2021, March 15-19, 2021, Virtual
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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