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Title: An Efficient Algorithm for Routing and Recharging of Electric Vehicles
In this paper, we address the routing and recharging problem for electric vehicles, where charging nodes have heterogeneous prices and waiting times, and the objective is to minimize the total recharging cost. We prove that the problem is NP-hard and propose two algorithms to solve it. The first, is an algorithm which obtains the optimal solution in pseudo-polynomial time. The second, is a polynomial time algorithm that obtains a solution with the total cost of recharging not greater than the optimal cost for a more constrained instance of the problem with the maximum waiting time of (1−ϵ)⋅W , where W is the maximum allowable waiting time.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1724227
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10288206
Journal Name:
COCOA 2020: Combinatorial Optimization and Applications
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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