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Title: WiFi-Enabled User Authentication through Deep Learning in Daily Activities
User authentication is a critical process in both corporate and home environments due to the ever-growing security and privacy concerns. With the advancement of smart cities and home environments, the concept of user authentication is evolved with a broader implication by not only preventing unauthorized users from accessing confidential information but also providing the opportunities for customized services corresponding to a specific user. Traditional approaches of user authentication either require specialized device installation or inconvenient wearable sensor attachment. This article supports the extended concept of user authentication with a device-free approach by leveraging the prevalent WiFi signals made available by IoT devices, such as smart refrigerator, smart TV, and smart thermostat, and so on. The proposed system utilizes the WiFi signals to capture unique human physiological and behavioral characteristics inherited from their daily activities, including both walking and stationary ones. Particularly, we extract representative features from channel state information (CSI) measurements of WiFi signals, and develop a deep-learning-based user authentication scheme to accurately identify each individual user. To mitigate the signal distortion caused by surrounding people’s movements, our deep learning model exploits a CNN-based architecture that constructively combines features from multiple receiving antennas and derives more reliable feature abstractions. Furthermore, more » a transfer-learning-based mechanism is developed to reduce the training cost for new users and environments. Extensive experiments in various indoor environments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed authentication system. In particular, our system can achieve over 94% authentication accuracy with 11 subjects through different activities. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1820624
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10292008
Journal Name:
ACM Transactions on Internet of Things
Volume:
2
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 25
ISSN:
2691-1914
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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