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Title: The Elliott and Connolly Benchmark: A Test for Evaluating the In-Hand Dexterity of Robot Hands
Achieving dexterous in-hand manipulation with robot hands is an extremely challenging problem, in part due to current limitations in hardware design. One notable bottleneck hampering the development of improved hardware for dexterous manipulation is the lack of a standardized benchmark for evaluating in-hand dexterity. In order to address this issue, we establish a new benchmark for evaluating in- hand dexterity, specifically for humanoid type robot hands: the Elliott and Connolly Benchmark. This benchmark is based on a classification of human manipulations established by Elliott and Connolly, and consists of 13 distinct in-hand manipulation patterns. We define qualitative and quantitative metrics for evaluation of the benchmark, and provide a detailed testing protocol. Additionally, we introduce a dexterous robot hand - the CMU Foam Hand III - which is evaluated using the benchmark, successfully completing 10 of the 13 manipulation patterns and outperforming human hand baseline results for several of the patterns.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1925130
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10293197
Journal Name:
IEEERAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots
ISSN:
2164-0572
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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