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Title: Dynamic, In-situ, Nonlinear-Inelastic Response and Post-Cyclic Strength of a Plastic Silt Deposit
This study presents the use of controlled blasting as a source of seismic energy to obtain the coupled, dynamic, linear-elastic to nonlinear-inelastic response of a plastic silt deposit. Characterization of blast-induced ground motions indicate that the shear strain and corresponding residual excess pore pressures (EPPs) are associated with low frequency near- and far-field shear waves that are within the range of earthquake frequencies, whereas the effect of high frequency P-waves are negligible. Three blasting programs were used to develop the initial and pre-strained relationships between shear strain, EPP, and nonlinear shear modulus degradation. The initial threshold shear strain to initiate soil nonlinearity and to trigger generation of residual EPP ranging from 0.002 to 0.003% and 0.008 to 0.012%, respectively, where the latter corresponded to ~30% of Gmax. Following pre-straining and dissipation of EPPs within the silt deposit, the shear strain necessary to trigger residual excess pore pressure increased two-fold. Greater excess pore pressures were observed in-situ compared to that of intact direct simple shear (DSS) test specimens at a given shear strain amplitude. The reduction of in-situ undrained shear strength within the blast-induced EPP field measured using vane shear tests compared favorably with that of DSS test specimens.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1663654
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10300367
Journal Name:
Canadian Geotechnical Journal
ISSN:
0008-3674
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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