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Title: Linking Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure to Study Exotic Nuclei Using the Dispersive Optical Model
The dispersive optical model (DOM) is employed to simultaneously describe elastic nucleon scattering data for 40Ca, 48Ca, and 208Pb as well as observables related to the ground state of these nuclei, with emphasis on the charge density. Such an analysis requires a fully non-local implementation of the DOM including its imaginary component. Illustrations are provided on how ingredients thus generated provide critical components for the description of the (d, p) and (e, e′p) reaction. For the nuclei with N > Z the neutron distribution is constrained by available elastic scattering and ground-state data thereby generating a prediction for the neutron skin. We identify ongoing developments including a non-local DOM analysis for 208Pb and point out possible extensions of the method to secure a successful extension of the DOM to rare isotopes.
Authors:
Editors:
Escher, Jutta et
Award ID(s):
1613362
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10304009
Journal Name:
Springer proceedings in physics
Volume:
254
ISSN:
0930-8989
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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