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Title: Self-controlling photonic-on-chip networks with deep reinforcement learning
Abstract We present a novel photonic chip design for high bandwidth four-degree optical switches that support high-dimensional switching mechanisms with low insertion loss and low crosstalk in a low power consumption level and a short switching time. Such four-degree photonic chips can be used to build an integrated full-grid Photonic-on-Chip Network (PCN). With four distinct input/output directions, the proposed photonic chips are superior compared to the current bidirectional photonic switches, where a conventionally sizable PCN can only be constructed as a linear chain of bidirectional chips. Our four-directional photonic chips are more flexible and scalable for the design of modern optical switches, enabling the construction of multi-dimensional photonic chip networks that are widely applied for intra-chip communication networks and photonic data centers. More noticeably, our photonic networks can be self-controlling with our proposed Multi-Sample Discovery model, a deep reinforcement learning model based on Proximal Policy Optimization. On a PCN, we can optimize many criteria such as transmission loss, power consumption, and routing time, while preserving performance and scaling up the network with dynamic changes. Experiments on simulated data demonstrate the effectiveness and scalability of the proposed architectural design and optimization algorithm. Perceivable insights make the constructed architecture become the self-controlling more » photonic-on-chip networks. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1650499
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10317242
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Volume:
11
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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