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Title: Comprehensive Investigations on Paralleling Operation of SiC MOSFETs based on Subcircuit Model in MATLAB/SIMULINK
Wide band gap (WBG) devices have been widely applied in industrial applications owning to their advantages of low switching loss, low on-stage voltage drop, and high operating temperature. Paralleling operation of power devices/modules is attractive due to its cost-effective and high power characteristics. In applications require very high current capability, paralleling operation of off-the-shelf power devices/modules becomes the only choice. However, current balancing operation of individual power device/module becomes difficult due to the differences of circuit parasitics. To investigate the device/module and circuit parasitics influences on the current sharing performance, in this article, a subcircuit model was built in MATLAB. Comprehensive comparisons and analysis are performed, which can provide guidance for engineers when designing the system with paralleling devices/modules. Moreover, the solutions to achieve current balancing operating are proposed with the aid of active gate driver. Experiment results are presented and analyzed to validate the effectiveness of current sharing solutions.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1939144
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10317621
Journal Name:
IEEE Workshop on Wide Bandgap Power Devices and Applications in Asia (WiPDA Asia)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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